asin() Function in R with Example

To calculate the inverse sine value of the input numeric value in R, use the asin() function.

asin() in R

The asin() is an inbuilt R trigonometric function that computes the sine inverse of the given value; the returned angle is in the range -pi/2 through pi/2.

Syntax

asin(x)

Parameters

The asin() function takes a column to compute on.

Example

Define two vectors and pass them to the asin() function.

v1 <- -1
v2 <- 0.5

asin(v1)
asin(v2)

Output

[1] -1.570796
[1] 0.5235988

If you pass the 0 to the asin() function, it will return 0.

v3 <- 0

Output

[1] 0

Plot the asin() function to a graph

We can use the seq() function to create a series of values and pass that to the plot() function, which will create a line chart.

dt <- seq(-1, 1, by = 0.05)
plot(dt, asin(dt), typ = "l", col = "red")
abline(v = 0, lty = 6, col = "blue")

Output

R asin() Function

Applying asin() function to a Vector

To define a Vector in R, use the c() function. Then pass that vector to the asin() function.

rv <- c(-1, 0.5, 0, 0.5, 1)
asin(rv)

Output

[1] -1.5707963 0.5235988 0.0000000 0.5235988 1.5707963

Passing a pi to the asin() function

The pi is an inbuilt constant in R programming, and its value is 3.141593.

Let’s find the pi constant’s asin() value.

asin(pi)

Output

[1] NaN
Warning message:
In asin(pi) : NaNs produced

You can see that it returns NaN(not a number) in the output.

Let’s see another example of pi.

asin(pi / 4)

Output

[1] 0.9033391

That is it for asin() function in R programming.

See also

R acos()

R tan()

R sin()

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